Rear Brake Drum Rebuild (Part 2)


Rear Brake Drum (Part 2)

For this section there is no background as it continues from Part 1 (click here for the quick link), this section will deal with cleaning repairs and the replacement kits, as there will be a slight overlap for the review of the parts the review will be under the Reviews Car Parts section or click here for a quick link.

Process:

OK, so the brakes are of and if you are lucky there will be no damage or wear and you can just replace the parts. I will start with the drum itself I think. This was a very very similar process to the front brakes. Rub down the rust and treat it in exactly the same way as before and apply the Granville Rust Cure to stop the rust, click here for the review. This was applied in two coats and the sprayed with the VHT Caliper Spray Paint, click here for the review, or go to the Consumables section. There was no real point of showing the second coat of Rust Cure as it went a brown shade of black and could not really be seen by the camera.

As I mentioned in Part 1 when I removed the shoes I could see a damaged groove where the brakes had been rubbing badly. This need sorting out as a priority, if it could not be fixed it will be a new plate, so it was worth having a go at the repair. I will keep a very close on this going forwards though and check after the first few drives I have in her. I used the wire wheel attachment to my lightweight electric drill on a slow medium speed to de-rust the plate. For the repair I used POR15 Patch, this comes in a tube and is a liquid metal type substance, which has the consistency of toothpaste, but when it dries it is rock solid. It is designed to fill seams or poor fitting joins. Do not get this stuff on your hands though. I used a very fine pallet knife to apply the paste into the grooves and smooth it as best I could as I would not have a lot of chance to make this super smooth. The first layer went in and I allowed it to set for 12 hours. I then used my Dremel 4000 grinding tool to take of the surplus and inspect the result. Where I could see a slight dip or shallow I re-applied some more patch again and prepared for the process again. Once I was happy with the result for the second time I Allowed it to dry fully. The next part like the drum was the de-rusting using the Granville again. This also had the required two coats and left to dry. After all this I finally sprayed the plate with the VHT Brake Caliper Spray, now you can’t see the repair and feels like solid steel again.

The next part was to clean up the hand brake lever arm, This sits behind the Secondary shoe and is held in place with a clip that locates on the front side of the shoe and has to be bent in place to hold the lever in place. This can only be done while the shoes are off the plate. This had the same de-rusting treatment and Rust Cure. Once completed I attached the lever to the back of the shoe. The hand brake lever is also better know as “Emergency Brake Lever”.

The repairs and clean up complete was now time for the fun bit to add the new parts. I was going to use the Wagner Rebuild kits and the Dorman Brake Cylinder. For the part I was missing I used the Mustang Manic bespoke part of the Lever to Shoe Link Bar. This was missing from my brakes and I managed to get the last two from Adam. (Don’t worry, he is getting some more made).

In the packets they come as a set and I have taken one set out in order to make it easier to see the contents. I will review the kit soon, click here for the link and will be found under the Reviews Parts section.

Where any metal brake parts touch metal I applied a good coating of the Cooper Slip grease, especial attention was given to the repaired areas of the plate. Rather than repeat pictures again as a step by step, the process is exactly the same as the front brakes except for the link bar. This is put in place before the top springs are applied. There are also instructions within the packets to show you what goes where. Click here for the Front Drum Rebuild Part 2 quick link for the step by step photos if you need to see them, or go to the Photos sections Wheels and Brakes menu.

Left rear

Left rear

Once your rebuild is complete you can then take the whole plate out to the axle ready for fitting.

Place the bolts back into the axle (if they were removed) then place the outer gasket on the axle mounting flange. Slide the backing plate over the bolts and add the inner gasket on to the plate.

Re-insert the shaft if it was removed and tighten the four bolts back up on the plate. If you need to add the hand brake then thread the end into the whole at the rear and locate the end lug behind the lever arm. I now pushed the rest of the cable into the whole at the rear untill all clicked into place. Add the brake pipe back onto the cylinder at the rear of the plate. I shall be reviewing the handbrake cable, click here for the quick link or go to the Parts Review menu.

That is your year brake(s) complete.

4 Responses to Rear Brake Drum Rebuild (Part 2)

  1. Aaron Broyles says:

    Any update on how the POR15 patch held up on the backing plate? Need to do this repair myself and want to know if I should get someone to weld them up for me if your repair happened to fail.

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  2. Keith Wagoner says:

    Great detail in your processes and photos. I couldn’t help but notice in your final rear brake assembly pictures it appears you did not install the brake pin plates. They are clearly indicated in the drawings you provided. Might not be a problem but figured I should mention it.

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    • Hi Keith,
      Thanks for the comment and stopping by, you are correct with regards to the plate. I have not seen any kits with this part or seen any on other brakes. It looks like a glorified washer of sorts. So I expect it will be fine. If you know any more info thst i coukd add, I would be grateful.

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