Bright Lights & Chrome

After a long week at work I didn’t think the weekend was ever going to get here. I had the car packed the night before to get to Mustang Maniac without any delays. Well that was apart from me dodging, rabbits, pheasants and any other form of livestock that decided that it wanted an early death by car! I managed to avoid all of them and my horn got used more time on that trip than the previous ten trips I reckon! Anyway I arrived to sea of people at the offices with Adam’s desk surrounded by customers at one point. I waited my turn to even say hello and discuss my plan of action. The plan was simple, rear bumper! This sounds like an easy task, but they can be a real pain if the bumpers are out of shape or don’t fit to the light panel. As the rear end of the car had been rebuilt this was going to be a moment of truth. I decided to take some pics of the process as I went along. I did get a helping hand from Yogi and Adam who popped in to see how I was doing. Apparently I was being a bit of wimp when it came to tightening the bolts up. The chrome bolts were sitting slightly proud and looked OK. The guys said that is not good enough and give it proper tightening up which pulled the bolts into the bumper and sat flush. The second side was a bit easier as I knew what to expect. I call it a learning process for me.

The whole set up comprises of a set of deluxe chrome bumper bolts, bumper irons (which I never had), mounting bolts and set of mounting pads to go between the bracket and the rear light panel.

The rear number plate fitting was screwed in first and only held in by two self tap screws. The wire will need to be long enough to get through the rear light panel to be connected to the rear side lights part of the loom.

Next up was the bumper irons, these will only fit one way and are shaped to the bumper itself with the angles.

The bolts are pushed through the squared out holes and the sprung washers are fitted over the bolts. Again these will only fit one way up due to the collar on the chrome bolts.

The bracket has to be massaged into place to fit the irons and to try to get the bolts to sit flat. This a bit of an art that I didn’t have before. Yogi loosened it all off and readjusted the positions and cranked on some pressure, this was to collapse the bumper washers to the irons forming a good fit, and to also pull the bolts down into the bumper itself. rbump11Both sides are exactly the same and there is no left or right hand sides on these parts. The mounting bolts are put through a large washer pushed out the light panel, a mounting pad made of dense foam goes over the bolts. The pads are tight around the bolt and will hold it in place to the light panel. The two-man job to align the bumper to the bolts goes without question, and the top bolts are tightened finger tight to hold the bumper in place. At this point Chris was extra set of eyes sitting further back behind the car to advise, “up a bit, down a bit, over a bit, wooo – too much” etc. This turned out to be a great help. We needed to move the bumper over a bit as it wasn’t exactly central so Yogi give it little nudge to adjust it up before the final tension on the bolts was done up. From underneath the bumper you can see the bolts into the irons. The two bolts each side are able to move inside the slots for the bolts to allow some movement to align them up. A trick of the trade was used to help align the bumper, but I have been sworn to secrecy on that one. I will say that it’s a great trick though.

rbump12

The down side is photo’s couldn’t really be taken as we were holding the bumper. The result was brilliant, a fantastic fitting bumper, as good as I have seen anywhere. Well chuffed with it.

rbump16

The rest of the day was involved in me completing the wiring at the back of the car and wrapping it with loom tape. As the LED light board had its own wires I soldered the connections in place to remove any opportunity for a poor connection. Heat shrink tubing was used to seal the soldered wires and then the full loom wrap. All of which you won’t see because it hidden out-of-the-way. Just a minor detail that nobody will see or notice except for the people who know, such as the MM guys who won’t let me get away with shoddy workmanship! Adam wanted to check out the rear loom was working fine and he used the Power Probe to make the LED boards in place.

Back up lamp.

backuplight

Side Lights.

sidelights

The indicator lights never seem to show up as amber very well on these pictures, but trust me they are bright.

indicators

The Brake lights are very bright too, so a huge upgrade to the standard Mustang lights.

brakelights

All in all a great day as a major part was fitted and it looked like I done something. Next week I’m not so sure what I am up too, but I have some more under hood tidying up to do. It’s all part of the adventure of bringing the car back to life. Waiting for next week already! That moment of truth of was talking about earlier on – no need to worry, it all fitted up without any major issues.

Thanks to the Guys, Adam, Yogi for the extra pair of hands and Chris for the extra pair of all-seeing eyes. 🙂

About One man and his Mustang

I'm just a man with a Classic 1966 Ford Mustang Coupe and a collection of tools that just keeps getting bigger in order that I could do the job right. When I first started this blog this is what I wrote: "I had bought a project car, that had been neglected, set fire to, rusted and abused. As a result of that she needed a bare metal strip down, a nut and bolt restoration." Four and a half years later the car was completed, on the road and shown at the UK's premier Classic Car Show, everything that was done to that car is documented here. I now have the privilege to drive one of America's most recognised cars and a true Icon, the Ford Mustang. I'm still sane after the blood, sweat and tears, so would I do it again? Oh yes!
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15 Responses to Bright Lights & Chrome

  1. Dana S. Hugh says:

    Nice butt 😉 Great work again, Mart!

    Like

  2. needhamb says:

    Really nice. Love the early Mustangs. We had a ’65 once upon a time.

    Like

  3. mud4fun says:

    Looking fab! That last shot looking upwards really shows how much has been done, from the axle, tank and suspension to the glorious bodywork. It looks stunning. Lights look good too, very bright even in the picture.

    Like

    • Thanks, all that hard work seems so long ago when you start putting the pretty bits on. Still loads to do but the back of the car is pretty much done. Still waiting for the trimmers on the interior as the last mini project.

      Like

  4. Great work, I am delighted!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Debbie says:

    As I read your post I was reminded of the absolutely priceless amount of information you are sharing. In essence, you are creating an internet based storehouse of how-tos. The Mustang community is overly blessed with your step-by-steps, photos, and stick-to-it attitude. Who knew when we started blogging a few summers ago that this would happen. Great work! 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you so much Debbie, very kind of you. I never knew that this would turn into what it is now, it was just going to be a little ol diary for me, maybe help a few others. My blog is starting to groan under the content now and may have to go pro soon to cope with it all. But it will be worth it. Every single comment i get makes my day. I am spurred on by the wonderful words that you (being my longest and most loyal follower from day one), and others have written on my blog. Feeling slightly humbled now. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. bzerob says:

    Reblogged this on Voices From The Garage and commented:
    Ohh! Shiney stuff! Nice!

    Like

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