A Confused Weekend

The weekend was the start of the winter and it looks like the first frost of the winter was on the cars overnight. The weekend on the car revolved around me messing with wires and cables in the car, in the garage. I managed to pick up a rather nice inline fuse kit that will display a red LED light if the fuse has gone, that way there is a visual guide to the potential issue instead of hunting for it in some very tight places like the back of the dash. The fuse holder itself is rated at a max of twenty amps and came supplied with four fuses, the choice was the lowest at five amps as there is no draw of current. If anything went wrong I would hope it takes the fuse out before any damage is done to the rest of the dash. the fuse holder is also splash proof so could be used under the hood for a pretty water tight fused connection. Has anybody used one of these before?

As the weather was so poor I decided to clean the main car in the afternoon on Sunday before it rained as the car was filthy dirty. As it was getting late I didn’t have time to do a full wash, shampoo, leather, wax & polish which is obviously the choice. With the time restraints I decided to use a product called “Showroom Shine” which I purchased from one of those shopping channels a couple of years ago and have been using on and off since then. They had a good deal on a couple of one litre bottles of the polish and cloths at the time. As I was cleaning I had a thought and yes it was a dangerous thing for a man to multi task as the women say. That thought was how about writing a review of it. I had no intention of reviewing it, but then again, why not? The results can be found here for the quick link or under the menu; Consumable Reviews – Showroom Shine. There are a few places that stock it now and online but Mustang Maniac have now started to stock the product on a trial basis as well. Is it any good? Read the review and find out.

front of bottle

front of bottle

 

Quick link:

Consumable Reviews – Showroom Shine

About One man and his Mustang

I'm just a man with a Classic 1966 Ford Mustang Coupe and a collection of tools that just keeps getting bigger in order that I could do the job right. When I first started this blog this is what I wrote: I had bought a project car, that had been neglected, set fire to, rusted and abused. As a result of that she needed a bare metal strip down, a nut and bolt restoration. Four and a half years later the car was completed, on the road and shown at the UK's premier Classic Car Show, everything that was done to that car is documented here. I now have the privilege to drive one of America's most recognised cars and a true Icon, the Ford Mustang. I'm still sane after the blood, sweat and tears, so would I do it again? Oh yes!
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16 Responses to A Confused Weekend

  1. thanks for the Shout Mart. It is a good product but like you say, nothing beats good ‘ol elbow grease and a little wax of course.

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  2. Dana S. Hugh says:

    Working in service/maintanance/repair department, we used to sell a lot of fuses with have different amps. All good, no recalls in service. But I have never seen or use that fuse holder. And be preventive, don’t splash anything on it 🙂

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  3. rigmover says:

    That fuse holder looks good, let me know how it goes.

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  4. Sorry, I don’t have the knowledge to help you, but good luck with the restoration.

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  5. You just got your first frost? Wow! We’ve been getting frost most nights since the 3rd week in September.

    Wiring! I do not like messing with wiring.

    I have to say that I’m impressed with anyone who can restore cars. I have several project cars on the property, and the only reason I keep them is that my daughter says she’s going to restore them some day. She managed to do a great job restoring a 1980 Datsun 280zx she picked up for $100 in 2004, but I think it will be awhile before she gets to the other cars: two VW bugs (1966 and 1976), a 1960 Rambler American, and my 1982 Ford F150. I used to work on my own cars and motorcycles (even to the level of rebuilding and replacing engines), and I did a stint as a diesel mechanical during my last semester in grad school nearly 30 years ago, but my mechanic days are over. But reading about your adventures is lots of fun.

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    • Kind words thank you. I am on a steep learning curve myself. I am lucky enough to have people to give me help and advice on any issues I may have or create for myself. Perhaps you can post some pics of your collection of projects as they get done. I would like to see them.

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      • I posted some photos on today’s blog.

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        • Brilliant set of pics and I have left a little comment for you to. Thanks for sharing the pics, and the shout out for my little ol blog too. Much appreciated. Also popped over to see the VW in the yard. Like the chrome bumper and everything else is looking tired.

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          • The VW’s both have histories. The Sun Bug has been all over the place, including Mexico where it picked up a few bullet holes in the hood. My daughter acquired it from a friend of ours. My wife’s father bought the Red VW new along with an International Travel All and a house all on the same day in 1966. We have the original receipt for the VW it was just shy of $1900, which would be around $18K in current dollars. My wife had to learn to work on cars, then her dad gave it to her, and we have had it ever since. We have done a couple of restoration projects on it over the years, but the sun in NM is really hard on paint.

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            • Great stories, I didn’t realise the old VW’s had cost that much! Great you still own it from new. Not sure I want to know what the bullet holes are for though. Lol

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            • Then there’s the 1960 Rambler American. This was my grandma’s car. Originally Peptol Bizmol pink, it has a flat head six engine (simple as can be), an old slush box automatic transmission — sluggish is an understatement. While our Mazda Speed 3 does 0-60 in a little over 5 seconds, the Rambler American only went from 0 to 10 mph in the same. And it has manual steering that has so much play that you have to turn the steering wheel 3 revolutions before the car starts to turn. My wife (girlfriend at the time) got where she refused to ride in the Rambler because she felt I was going to drive into the ditch with the unresponsive steering (I thought it was kind of exciting myself).

              I drove this car a lot as a teenager in the middle ’70’s. I finally got it painted blue, because, besides the fact I don’t like Peptol Bizmol pink, I discovered it was quite dangerous for a 16 year old boy to be driving a pink car out here in the wild west in the 1970’s.

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            • Rofl. Great story again the Rambler soynds like a real handful. I suspect you were right to repaint it blue in the West like u say. With all these things, I would love to have a go in one, perhaps somewhere with no ditches. Lol

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