Protecting The Chrome Jewels

On a recent visit to a good friend of mine who also owns a rather nice and rare coloured Mustang Convertible I was shown around his latest collection of Mustang memorabilia where I spotted in middle of his (man cave) garage a dehumidifier. He went on to explain the benefits of it and I could feel the air was different to mine at home. that was it, I was sold on the idea and set about getting one. So I done a little research from various places and found these points where I have collated them and made them a little more readable, I hope. I have since seen references to classic cars with lots of chrome like mine as the “Chrome Jewels”. I quite like that sying in fact. Many storage companies of classic cars all have climate controlled environments.

Rust will form where the surface of the steel has air and water. The first step is to stop the elements reaching the steel, paint does the job pretty well, but even better is wax or  similar coatings, or Waxoyl etc. Chrome is surprisingly porous and normally underneath the chrome plate is steel so it needs protecting. A covering of wax, ordinary car wax or Gibbs, will do the trick, it looks invisible, adds shine and protection. Don’t forget that a chrome cleaner is generally abrasive and removes any wax coating, by all means use it to clean, but it doesn’t protect the chrome.

Don’t get to hung up about the temperature vs humidity, as it’s often being mentioned to keeping humidity below 50% to stop rust, but it’s a bit more complicated than that and one of the keys is understanding about “dew” points. All air contains water and as the temperature drops that water tries to change back from a vapour to a liquid, that’s what causes rain, warm moist air pushed up by the weather cools and the water in that cloud becomes a liquid which is heavy and falls out of the cloud – rain. In your own home you see it as condensation around bedroom windows on cold mornings. It is around the window because that is normally the coldest part of the room.

There are 3 ways to fix condensation:

  1. Heat the room so the air inside can hold more water.
  2. Open the window (ventilate) in the hope that air coming in from outside will be dryer and therefore hold more water.
  3. Use a dehumidifier to reduce the percentage of water in the air.

The theory of condensation effect is to take a can of cold drink from the fridge and put it on the table or work top. Even in a warm house you immediately see condensation on the can as the water in the air rushes to the can and condenses back into a liquid. This is the same principle as how a dehumidifier works, you present a cold surface to the air, the air in turn gives up its water which is then collected in a container. The fan in the dehumidifier keeps an airflow over the cold chilled surface so as much air as possible reaches the cold surface.

Back to my Garage; heating the space to about 20c works well (in fact any heat helps) because the higher the temperature the less the water has a chance to condense back to a liquid. This is why I fitted a radiator in my garage, much to the bemusement of my wife! unfortunately it’s not the complete answer though. Another example of the condensation is that you get condensation in a bathroom after a long hot shower even if the air temperature is 25 or even 30c. You could indeed heat a normal garage to 20c, the car would sit in there and not deteriorate, but even with insulation that is expensive way of doing it. Hence why the US “dry State” cars are so popular in UK as there is not much chance of the rust taking hold in the past.

I have done all the usual things; The heating and water boiler is in my garage and gives of heat to the room as the hot water passes through the pipes. I have insulated as much as possible, the walls are cavity filled, the ceiling has plenty of insulation up there and the all important plastic floor to stop the cold coming up through the concrete. The up and over door has brushes to keep the draft out and the back of the door has heat insulating sheets. That way I should then be able to keep the space at least 9c throughout the winter with no additional heating and that is obviously a big help.

On the other hand, when you open the garage door the same thing can happen on a warm moist day, the air rushes in and condensation forms on whatever is coldest part in there, that is mostly going to be your prized possession, your car. I found this rather good chart to show the relative ranges of humidity and what I am trying to explain:

So I have bought myself a dehumidifier. I have reviewed it here and is also under the accessory menu on the main bar. I wanted two things from the non-negotiable options. An option for constant draining and the low-cost of running it over 24/7 scenario. The options were a little limited for my modest budget.  I managed to pick up a well rated PureMate PM412 for a modest cost of £120 reduced by sixty pounds from the recommended retail price. I also purchased a digital humidity gauge and left it in the garage for a couple of days to get a reading. There is a max and min scale for both the temperature and the humidity. The gauge is on top of the car in the middle of the garage.

The unit is compact and neat looking with a capacity of twelve litres a day. There is a digital read out and super simple to work and set up. The gauge above shows the first night was 45rh to a max of 50rh which I was super happy with.

The unit has a castor wheels and a recessed handle which is so easy to move around. There is a one meter length of tubing they even supply for the constant drain should you need it which I will of course. The ease of movement makes it ideal to shove out-of-the-way in the corner of the garage when working on the car.

The collection tray can hold one and half litres of water, and over night I think it was up to about a little under a litre. So I am having to empty it morning and evening now until I plumb it in. But, that is the unit settling the environment down then they should reduce considerably after a few days. It doesn’t matter if I forget to empty it as the unit will shut down when the tray is full.

The power consumption os a max of 245w on full power, but as I only ran mine on a low setting it should work out quite economical to run especially as it will be on all the time. Has anybody else got any tips or tricks they would like to share storing their car over the winter? Please post a reply and we can all share the knowledge.

Roll on the spring so I can take the car out for a drive. I have an itch I can’t scratch when I can’t drive my car.

About One man and his Mustang

I'm just a man with a Classic 1966 Ford Mustang Coupe and a collection of tools that just keeps getting bigger in order that I could do the job right. When I first started this blog this is what I wrote: "I had bought a project car, that had been neglected, set fire to, rusted and abused. As a result of that she needed a bare metal strip down, a nut and bolt restoration." Four and a half years later the car was completed, on the road and shown at the UK's premier Classic Car Show, everything that was done to that car is documented here. I now have the privilege to drive one of America's most recognised cars and a true Icon, the Ford Mustang. I'm still sane after the blood, sweat and tears, so would I do it again? Oh yes!
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21 Responses to Protecting The Chrome Jewels

  1. I only use a humidifier if I’m ill.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This was a really interesting article. I’m not exactly an extreme car guy, but this was good info for any car owner…especially if you really love your car.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Great article, very helpful. I reblogged it because I think a lot of my readers could benefit from this. Thanks for writing it.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Reblogged this on Customs -N- Classics and commented:
    Check this out. A great article on dealing with humidity and ways to keep your garage from destroying your car/truck/bike. Although it is from the UK, the basic premise is the same in the US, so, this is a great read for anyone who wants to protect their prized possesion.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Boris says:

    Really interesting blog. Got one in my garage and it makes so much of a difference. I was surprised just how much moisture is in the fabric of my garage..but once that is removed it’s stayed really nice and dry. Really envious of our friends in Oz….can send them some of our damp, cold, grey January if they want!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Tim Harlow says:

    Great article. Here in Utah in the western US, we have too little humidity. But having lived in Houston and the Seattle, Washington area, I can relate. Once again thanks for the great post.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Bernie VALENTINI says:

    Bernie here from Melbourne Australia…………great pics and details of your efforts; well done.
    My condolensces that you have to wait till Spring to drive your “Beloved Pony”……. you make us Ozzies realize how lucky we are that we can drive our “collectables” 365 days per year less the few days per year when it rains; I go all out to avoid ever getting any of my 20 cars wet ! The main damage here in Oz is if you live too close to the beach; salt air is hard to mitigate, but our club members go all out to “seal” their Garage like you have shown.
    Let us know your name ! …..can’t find it anywhere !
    cheers
    Bernie

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Bernie, a choice of 20 cars 😃 now that is amazing. Rain is a big part of UK and even the summer you can’t guarantee the sun. The next plan is to have a more draft proof roller door fitted. The money i dave on petrol will go towards that. Shouldn’t take to long at 12mpg.
      Thanks for stopping by little ol blog i appreciate it.
      My name is Mart(in) but i hate my full name so its always shortened to Mart, unless the wife is telling me off. 😂

      Like

  8. Timothy Price says:

    Classic cars generally lasts for ever. Our intense sun and ozone at our high altitude fades paint and cracks plastics and upholstery.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Timothy Price says:

    It’s very dry here, so classic cars last forever.

    Liked by 1 person

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