Nobody Will Ever Know

The weekend couldn’t come quick enough for me and seemed such a long week until it finally arrived. Saturday I woke with a feeling of knowing exactly what I wanted to do, but I didn’t really want to do it. It was going to be messy, it was going to hurt and it would never be seen. But that is the nature of restoration that I have learned so very quickly. The job in question was removing Waxoyl from inside the car roof. As you may or may not know, I had fun and games removing it from the floor pans before I treated them with POR15 paint. This time it was above me and I wasn’t too sure how I was going to attack it. Red Bull drinks were lined up and snacks were lined up like little toy soldiers on my Blue Point work cart, I knew what was coming. Plan A; was to rub the wax off with a bunch of rags and degreasant, I tried but I only seemed to spread it about and not remove it fully. Plan B; drink Red Bull and find a scraper while eating a snack. This gave the poor ol’ bloke arm muscles time to recover from half an hour of what seemed like somebody setting fire to them, they were burning that much. The man cave has lots of things that I have stored, (not hoarded – Stored) to choose from. I found all sorts of flexible implements that I could try and felt rather pleased with myself walking back to the garage. Trials were undertaken for the best tool. First was a plastic separator for a tool compartment – that was too soft, but would make an excellent filler spreader tool. (Note made to self at this point, for a small spreader use this bit of plastic). Secondly I had a silicon sealer remover, this was OK but too small and hurt the hands due to the funny angles on it. Thirdly I had a pallet knife that was good but again to small and too stiff and dug into the metal on more pronounced curves as it was sharp. The winner was an old filling knife I used for decorating, it was flexible and formed to the very slight curves of the roof, it didn’t dig into the metal and scraped of a good amount each time.

roof4

I started from the back to the front and the flex of the blade followed the roof well. The whole process was messy as the skin grafts of wax were raining down on me and went everywhere. At the start of the work you can see the roof under the wax which wasn’t pretty but it worried me a bit as it looked rust coloured, so I wanted to protect it best the best way possible. I took a photo of half the roof done for a comparison with and without the Waxoyl to show what it was hiding.

The mess was unbelievable and the old towels I had put down were not enough to cope with the mess. The side pillars at the rear were also cleaned up but were going to get a slightly different process. Snacks were consumed and a fair amount of water taken into the system. Arms are now aching beyond belief.

Once the roof was stripped of the wax I had to degrease it with the strongest mixture of POR Marine Clean  I could mix up on 1:1 basis. This cut through the grease and left a very clean surface after a couple of treatments. this was left to dry thoroughly.

I used a full tin of Rust Prevention paint (picture on the process page, or click here) as this time as there was no real rust to be fair. The paint required two thin coats within ten minutes of each other. They looked a little patchy when drying but the end results was amazingly smooth and consistent to a whitish grey in colour.

The side pillars were a different story as the bottoms by the shelf was rusted a little more and need some treatment of the Granville Rust Cure. Once that had dried off too I used some Eastwoods Rust Encapsulator to spray behind the pillars into all the little gaps then sprayed the outside all the way down to the window winder area. The satin black cuts the light down in the car again. Around the roof where the inner rail is there was not enough prevention spray for all of it. So I decided to Eastwood those areas too, while trying to prevent a little over spray not that it would ever matter of course. Another note to self; start on the rear shelf soon.

The end result looks quite good due to a contrast of the black and white, the down side is once the head liner goes in – Nobody will ever see it and nobody will ever know!

Quick Links:

For the full process so far of the work; Photo Menu – Inside The Car – Roof & Sides Rust Treatment, or click here.

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Rust bustin’

Bank holiday is here it’s Friday afternoon and it’s raining, typical. As it seems to be a story of my life being married to a teacher, part of the job they didn’t tell her about is that you get to take home all sorts of germs and bugs the kids decide to spread around at the school. As a result I get my fair share too. So guess what, I have not got man flu but a much more dangerous strain on from that – Bloke Pneumonia. Yep, it needs TL Car parts to make me feel better. None of this, pop two pills watch Fast & the Furious 1- 17 (or what ever they are up to) and you will sleep it of lark. Nope – I want a sniff of Redex & Carb cleaner to sort me out! Seriously though, I hope to get down to a Classic Car show in Enfield, armed with a pocket full of Aloe Vera soft tissues I might add, not. My tissues will be Wet & Dry soaked with Super Plus Unleaded petrol. The Enfield Pageant (click here for the web link), has an autojumble of over five hundred stalls, a central arena of attractions and of course cars, lots of cars. I have spoken to Mustang Maniac who tell me they will be there as well, possibly bringing the fabled rare Indy 500 Pace Car with them. Pop over and say hello to the guys and say that Mart sent you from one man and his Mustang blog. You may even see me standing there coughin and splutterin’ too. I will take some pictures and post them when I get a chance. Just a quick note to say Mustang Maniac have changed their blog to http://mustangmaniac.org sounds a lot better, but don’t worry you can still get there via the old .wordpress.com page as well.

I have been busy with my reviews and finished one off now, I have posted a review of the Stanley FatMax Deep Pro Organizer under the Reviews – Tools – Stanley Tools section, or click here for the quick link.

There is a new button “Rust” on my menu bar for a little experiment I wanted to try between two products directly. My “Rust Comparison Test” will be between the Titans of the rust world: Granville Rust Cure & Rustbuster fe-123. Much has been said about these products and I have both. I like the Granville and I like the Rustbuster, but who is the best? I certainley don’t know. To try and answer that I have posted my first video of the test on my YouTube channel, “One man and his Mustang” or click the YouTube icon below for the quick link. I have been reading up on the various tests, reviews along with their results. But there are no pictures, so I am trying to put that right and people can see the tests now. I plan on making a few quick videos in a time lapse sort of style over the next few months along with taking pictures for the blog as intermediary updates as it were. See what you think of the video article idea and please let me know. Leave a comment or email me. I will always try to get back to you.

Rust Comparison Test for “Granville Rust Cure” vs “Rustbuster fe-123” quick link to the my write up click here

Or click below for the YouTube first video

click here for the link
Part 1 –  YouTube video
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